• 5/28/2021

     

     

     

    I am always on the lookout for ways to add personality to my quilts, and my current favorite way is with an improv pieced border.

    If you are not tech-savvy (like me) and you like to play with scale and design in a way that feels doable, this tutorial might be what you are looking for.

     

    I absolutely love the look of a slightly wonky triangle border but you could be more precise with your version.

     

    For this particular sample, I will be working with a finished block. If you are planning to use this technique, I think it’s helpful to work with blocks as your paper pieced length. It helps keep things straight and lined up nicely, especially if you are using this technique with a very large quilt

     

    My block size is 10 x 10” so I will be using a piece of freezer paper ( you could use printer paper or tracing paper) and drawing a rectangle measuring the block length x the height that I like. For this, I want my finished block height to be 2 ½” so I will be drawing my rectangle to measure 10 x 3”

     

    Once you have drawn the rectangle, measure down ¼” from the inside of the rectangle and draw another rectangle. The inner rectangle will be the area of the paper piecing.

    I like to find the center of the rectangle and make a little mark.

     

    Draw your triangles within the inner rectangle making sure that the points meet at the inner rectangle line. They can be any width but do need to meet up at a sharp point.

    Starting at one end, number the triangles like in the photo. This is the order in which you will be piecing.

    Roughly cut around this pattern piece, I like to cut ¼ - 1/2 “ away from the outer (cutting) line

     

    If you want all of the pieced panels to be different, now would be the time to draw them all out. If you will be making a large border, you could simply take this and make photocopies.

     

    I like to cut all of my fabric pieces in advance, always 1 “ longer and wider than each numbered segment. I find this helpful, especially when you are paper piecing angled sections.

    On my pattern piece, number 1 is green and number 2 is print. With the green on top of the print, I lay the pattern piece with the line between 1 and 2 running a bit more that 1/4”over onto the side of 2.

    You could put a dab of glue here to secure the fabric but since this is so small, I will just carefully hold it all together and take it to the machine.

     

    On my Janome Continental M7, I set my stitch length to 1.3 and sew down the line between 1 and 2, sewing a teensy bit past the inner rectangle line.

    Using a piece of cardboard or in my case my folding friend, fold the paper back on the stitch line and trim the seam to ¼”

     

    Open out your pieces and give them a good press.

    Next, with the paper pattern facing up, fold back the line between 2 and 3.

    Trim the excess fabric to ¼”

    Add the next piece of fabric, lining up the straight edges and carefully flip it over and sew along the line.

    Continue this way until you have sewn all of the pieces.

    Trim down the pattern piece to the outer line.

    Continue this until you have made the desired amount of border sections.

    I love this method! As a slap dash, fly by the seat of my pants quilter, paper piecing gives me the ability to still do things in my wonky improve way but with a precision that I love!

  • 6/16/2021

    Father's Day comes at a great time of year for the dad that enjoys fishing and a summer fishing trip with a new fishing pole-carrying bag makes a perfect and relaxing afternoon.

     

    Janome Maker Heidi Proffetty has just what the Fishing Dad in your life will treasure! A free tutorial for a fishing pole bag using her Janome Continental M7!  Not only does the carrying bag sew up in a jiffy, but the fabric is also made from is waxed canvas which is both durable and water-resistant. You can also customize this bag. Make alterations to the overall length to fit Dad’s specific fishing pole length and change the bag’s accent panel to give it that extra special touch. Give him something he will love using the rest of this summer and beyond. 

     

     

     

    Skill Level: Beginner 

    Makes: 1 Fishing Pole Bag 

    Dimensions: 48” Length x 10” Width

    Time: 1 ½ hours

     

     

    Before You Begin

    Measure the fishing pole’s length and width around the reel (if the reel is attached). This will determine your specific dimensions and the amount of fabric that you will need for this project. This project is suited for a lightweight, freshwater, 4.6” to 5” fishing pole with an approximate 10” diameter (attached) reel. 

     

    Project Supplies:

    1 ½ yards of waxed cotton canvas fabric, Color: Moss

    ½ yard novelty upholstery or canvas fabric, Pattern: Fishing

    24” x 1 ½” webbing or belt strapping 

    20” piece of cording and a cord stop

    2 – 2” x 3” twill patches

    General color matching sewing thread for construction

    Scissors

    Fabric marking chalk pen (light colored)

    Cutting mat, rotary cutter & ruler

    Mini clips (not pins)

    Compass

    Glue Stick

    Janome Continental M7, Overcasting M foot & HP foot & plate

     

    Part 1 – Cut Fabric

    Use your rotary cutter, cutting mat, and ruler. 

    1. Cut 1 – 35 ½” x 12 ½” piece of waxed fabric

    2. Cut 1 – 5 ½” x 12 ½” piece of waxed fabric

    3. Cut 1 – 10 ½” x 12 ½” piece of novelty fishing fabric

    Part 2 – Sewing Instructions

    Set your sewing machine up with the Overcasting M Foot (or serger). Use mini clips to hold the right sides of the fabric together at each end. Position the novelty fabric so that the fabric is facing in the upright direction (not upside down) to the top section of the bag.

     



















    On the outside of the bag, using the fabric marking chalk pen, mark a center indications at 1 ½”, 6 ½”, and 24” down from the top edge of the bag. Next, draw a vertical centering line from 1 ½” mark to the 24” mark. 

     














    The 6 ½” mark will be the guideline for the top edge of the shoulder strap and the 24” mark will be the guideline for the bottom edge of the shoulder strap.

     











    On the wrong side of bag, use a glue stick to temporarily secure a twill patches to both ends where the strap will be sewn . The patches provide extra support for any tugging on the shoulder strap.












    Using a chalk pen, mark indications on the strap, 2 ½” down from the top and bottom edges.

    Fold the strap under a ½” at each end, sew the strap onto the right side of the bag at the 6 ½” & 24” markings you made. 

     

    To securely hold the strap to the bag, stitch on top of the strap around all 4 sides creating a box. Stitching close to the outer edges. Inside the stitched box, mark an X from corner to corner. Then stitch on top of the X markings you made. Repeat this for each end of the strap.

     

    Trim the excess fabric around twill patches close to stitching but be careful not to cut bag’s fabric.

    For neat inside seams, serge or fold the raw edges ¼” under twice. Using mini clips to hold folded edges in place. Then sew close to the folded edge. 

    To create the casing for drawstring at top of the bag, fold the fabric under twice ½”. Then sew close to the folded edge, creating an opening for the cording to pass through.











    Place right sides of the bag together, hold edges secure using mini clips, and tucking the strap inside the bag out of the way. Starting approximately 4 ½” from the top edge of the casing (top of bag), backstitch, then stitch (or serge) down the side seam or edge of the bag. This closes the bag and will create a long tube with a 4 ½’ opening at the top.

     





    Use a compass to mark and cut a 2” diameter circle from a leftover piece of waxed canvas. Fold the circle in quarters and mark to create temporary alignment markings.

    Starting at the seam on the bag, mark 4 (90 degrees) cross indications around inside bottom edge of the tube. Using the 4 cross markings on the cut circle to align with the markings on the inside bottom of the tube. Use mini clips and attach the cut circle to the tube aligning bottom edges evenly. Using HP Foot and HP plate (or your preferred sewing foot) to sew ¼” around inside bottom edge.

     

    Part 4 – Finishing the Bag

    Turn the bag right sides out.

    Using a safety pin attached to one end of the cording, work the cord through the casing. Add a cord lock and tie a secure knot at the end. Add a dab of glue to the cord ends to keep them from unraveling. 

     

     

     

     

    Now this fishing pole carrying bag is ready to go on Dad’s next fishing trip!

    Happy Sewing and Happy Father’s Day!

    Heidi

    www.heidi@heidiproffetty.com

     

  • 7/6/2021

    Save time and have more quilts finished by machine binding your quilt! Janome Maker Melanie Call from Machine Binding Tutorial with Janome M7! 

     

    A close-up of a map

Description automatically generated with low confidence

     

    Hello Janome Friends! I'm Melanie from A Bit of Scrap Stuff (Blog or Instagram) and today I'm sharing my favorite technique for machine binding! 

     

    I absolutely love machine binding my quilts, pillows, and projects because it is durable, quick, and looks fabulous! This is how I bind 99.999999% of all of my projects. It is the way ;). 

    Ready to Learn: Machine Binding

    *I'm sewing on a Janome M7 - so your Janome sewing machine screen/controls may look a bit different.

     

    Supplies:

    A picture containing text, appliance

Description automatically generated

     

    Step 1: Make Binding

    • If multiple strips of fabric are needed - sew 2.5"binding strips together on the bias to make 1 long binding strip. Sewing strips together on the diagonal (bias) creates fewer bulky seams.

    • Janome M7 settings. A foot, straight stitch, 1.8 stitch length *May also use Dual Feed Holder with UD Foot (walking foot) if preferred

    Text

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

    • Place left binding strip right side up. Then place the next binding strip perpendicular right sides together Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of the top fabric as shown below.

    Qr code

Description automatically generated with low confidence

    • Stitch along a drawn diagonal line. Trim 1/4" away from the sewn line. Hint- make sure you have sewn your binding strips correctly together before trimming.

     

    • Press binding strip in half (wrong sides together). The binding strip will measure 1.25" in width when folded wrong sides together

    A picture containing indoor, footwear

Description automatically generated



    Step 2: Attach Binding to BACK of quilt/pillow/project

    • Attach Dual Feed Foot Holder (walking foot) with 1/4" OD foot attached (top foot in photo). Needle position 1/4", Stitch Length 2.0, and activate Dual Feed button on screen (highlighted in yellow in photo below). I prefer to use my Dual Feed Foot for attaching binding as the machine is sewing through multiple layers (quilt top, batting, quilt backing, plus double-fold binding).

    A picture containing text, appliance

Description automatically generated

     

    A picture containing text, indoor

Description automatically generated

     

    • Starting about 6" from the end of the binding tail, place binding on BACK of project. Line up raw edges of binding and raw edges of the project. Attach/Sew with 1/4" seam allowance until you are about 3" from the corner.

    A picture containing indoor, appliance

Description automatically generated



    • Mitering Corner of Binding. Draw a line 1/4" from edge of project. Continue sewing until you reach the drawn line. Back Stitch. Stitch off the project at a 45-degree angle (see yellow arrow below) - this helps with the next step. Cut thread and remove the quilt from the machine.

    A picture containing text

Description automatically generated

     

    A picture containing text, fabric

Description automatically generated

    Fold binding upwards so edge of binding aligns with edge of project and stitched line from previous step when you stitched off the project at a diagonal to the corner.

     

    • Fold binding down so the folded edge of binding aligns with the raw edge of the project. Attach a wonder clip to hold the binding in position. Begin stitching 1/4" from the edge of the project. Backstitch. Repeat at all corners to miter.

    A picture containing text, fabric

Description automatically generated

     

     

    • Stop stitching about 10" from the beginning. 

    A picture containing text

Description automatically generated

     

    • Overlap binding tails by 2 3/8". Draw a line and cut on the drawn line. I find a 2 3/8" overlap makes my binding fit best. Traditionally the overlap would be 2 1/2" since that is the original width of the binding.

    A picture containing text, fabric

Description automatically generated

     

    • Sew 2.5"binding tails together on the bias. Unfold binding tails. Place fabric on the left-right side up. Then place other binding tail perpendicular right sides together. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of the top fabric as shown below. Sewing binding tails on the diagonal (bias) reduces seam bulk.

    A picture containing fabric, gift wrapping

Description automatically generated

     

    • Stitch along a drawn diagonal line. Refold binding and check that your binding is the correct size THEN trim 1/4" away from the sewn line. Finish attaching binding with 1/4" seam. Backstitch over beginning stitches to secure start/stop.

    A picture containing fabric

Description automatically generated

     

    A picture containing text, fabric

Description automatically generated



    Step 3: Stitch Binding to FRONT of Project

     

    • Change to Dual Feed Open Toe UD Foot, Dual Feed Key selected, Needle Position Center, and Stitch Length 2.0

    A picture containing text, indoor, screenshot, several

Description automatically generated

     

    • Wrap binding to the front of the project and secure with wonder clips. Bring up the bobbin thread before stitching to prevent thread knot on the back of the project. Stitch 1/8" away from the folded edge of the binding.

    A person standing next to a machine

Description automatically generated with low confidence

     

    • Continue stitching until about 3" away from the corner. Fold binding on the unstitched side up and hold down. Then fold binding from the stitched side over the project to create a mitered corner. 

    A picture containing indoor, decorated

Description automatically generated

     

    A close-up of a computer keyboard

Description automatically generated with low confidence

     

    • Stitch to corner. Raise presser foot (leave the needle in DOWN position). Rotate project. Lower presser foot and continue stitching down the binding. Repeat for all mitered corners. Backstitch over beginning stitches to secure. 

    A picture containing appliance

Description automatically generated

     

    A picture containing fabric

Description automatically generated



    Congratulations your project is now bound and ready to be loved!

     



    A picture containing text, fabric

Description automatically generated



    Tutorials are available for Oh Happy Day Pillow front (HERE) and attaching an exposed zipper for pillow backing (HERE)

     

    A picture containing indoor, decorated

Description automatically generated



    Be sure to follow me for more sewing fun and more examples of machine binding! A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog (here) or Instagram (here).


    Happy Sewing!
    Melanie Call








  • 7/7/2021

    Christmas in July is a time-honored tradition that started July 25, 1933, at a camp in Brevard, NC.  You can read more about its origin on the Southern Living website  HERE.

    Janome Maker Melanie Call from A Bit of Scrap Stuff has started the Good Tiding Quilt Along to get your Christmas in July celebration and your Christmas sewing started early! 

     

    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuff #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt #Rileyblakedesigns

    Hi Janome Friends! It's Melanie Call from A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog or @ABitofScrapStuff . I'm a Janome Maker that sews and quilts with the Janome Continental M7 ... it's an amazing machine for quilt piecing AND free motion quilting!

    I'm so excited to host the Good Tidings FREE Quilt Along that starts on July 7th. I will be sharing the Good Tidings Quilt Pattern section each week starting Wednesday, July 7th - on my A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog.  PLUS there will be prizes from Riley Blake Designs, Fat Quarter Shop, and Oliso so be sure to join in!

    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuff #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt #Rileyblakedesigns

    All About Christmas designed by J.Wecker Frisch for Riley Blake Designs is perfect for the Good Tidings Quilt. I loved being able to fussy cut the Christmas Typography fabric for the star block centers. The Story  fabric was perfect for the large border.

    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuff #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt #Rileyblakedesigns
     

    Gather Up your fabric so you can start cutting on July 7th

     
    --- Good Tidings Quilt Fabric Requirements --- 
    • (9) Fat eighths or 1/8 yard cut Star Points
    • 1/2 yard * Star center [* 1 yard if fussy cutting fabric *If using Christmas Typography - make sure there are 3 full repeats of CHRISTMAS for fussy cutting.]
    • 3/4 yard background
    • 1/4 yard red patchwork corners
    • 1/4 yard green patchwork corners
    • 1/2 yard black patchwork corners
    • 2/3 yard sashing
    • 1/8 yard sashing corner
    • 2/3 yard inner border
    • 1 1/4 yard outer border  [* 2 yards if fussy cutting fabric]
    • 2/3 yard binding
    • 4 yards backing

    *Fabrics used in cover quilt --- Riley Blake Designs – All About Christmas (available HERE)
    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuff #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt #Rileyblakedesigns

    I hope you can join in for the Good Tidings Quilt Along! I can't wait to see your fabric selections! Be sure to share your fabric pulls on Instagram with #GoodTidingsQAL
     
    I'll be back on July 7th with Cutting Instructions.
     
    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuff #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt #Rileyblakedesigns
     
    Be sure to follow me on Instagram @ABitofScrapStuff and on my A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog for more fabric fun!

    Have a great day and happy quilting! 
    Be sure to keep tuned in to what Melanie is creating by visiting:

    My Blog: A Bit of Scrap Stuff - https://abitofscrapstuff.blogspot.com My Quilt Patterns - https://www.etsy.com/shop/ABitofScrapStuff My Instagram: @ABitofScrapStuff -https://www.instagram.com/abitofscrapstuff/

  • 7/15/2021

     A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuffPattern #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt  #RileyBlakeDesigns #Quilt

     

    Hi Janome Friends!  It is time to start piecing the Good Tidings Block with Janome Maker Melanie Call from A Bit of Scrap Stuff!

    Join Melanie for her favorite part of making a quilt! She loves watching the cut pieces of fabric become a quilt...just like a fabric puzzle. Plus her Janome M7 sews so fabulously!

    This week we will be sewing the Flying Geese Block ... I love this versatile block! Be sure to keep reading as you can make bonus half-square triangle blocks from the trimmed fabric scraps.

     

    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuffPattern #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt  #RileyBlakeDesigns #Quilt

     

    Good Tidings Quilt Flying Geese Instructions (HERE) Don't forget to share your fabric selection, cutting, and flying geese  on Instagram with the hashtag #GoodTidingsQAL

    Each week  I will be sharing a new pattern section each for the FREE Good Tidings Quilt Quilt Along (schedule at end of blog post)

    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuffPattern #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt  #RileyBlakeDesigns #Quilt

     

    Good Tidings Quilt    
    #GoodTidingsQAL     59.5" x 59.5"
    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuff #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt #RileyBlakeDesigns

     

    Flying Geese Instructions

     

    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuffPattern #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt  #RileyBlakeDesigns #Quilt

    Bonus Half-Square Triangles 
    Don't toss the trimmed off triangle fabric scraps. You can sew (2) triangles together to make a half-square triangle! 
    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuffPattern #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt  #RileyBlakeDesigns #QuiltA Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuffPattern #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt  #RileyBlakeDesigns #Quilt
    Trim the half-square triangles to 2.5" squares. I like to use the Bloc-loc Half-Square Triangle Ruler for accurate trimming.  You can use the (72) half-square triangles to create a bonus project! My favorite scrap project is to make a pillow because each quilt needs a matching pillow :)

    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuffPattern #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt  #RileyBlakeDesigns #Quilt
     
     
    Good Tidings Quilt Along Schedule
    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuff #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt #RileyBlakeDesigns

    Good Tidings Quilt Along Blog Posts
    A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog #ABitofScrapStuffPattern #GoodTidingsQAL #GoodTidingsQuilt  #RileyBlakeDesigns #Quilt
     
     
    I can't wait to see your Good Tidings Quilt progress photos!!! #GoodTidingsQAL
     
    Be sure to follow me on Instagram @ABitofScrapStuff and on my A Bit of Scrap Stuff Blog for more fabric fun!

    Have a great day and happy quilting! 

    Melanie Call



     

     

Prev 1 2 Next 
DEALERS
The TWO Closest Dealers to you are:
454 MAIN AVE. , NORWALK CT, 06851
203-846-2442
196 Boston Post Road , Orange CT, 06477
203-878-1654
Find Additional Dealers