• 5/5/2021

    Celebrate Mom by designing and embroidering customized ribbons with your Janome embroidery machine, to compliment your gift wrapping. Let her know just how much she means to you by including a special message of your choice. 

     

    Janome Artisan Maday from Sustainable Textile Design has the perfect solution to add that special touch to all of your gifts for Mother’s Day and throughout the year! 

     

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    Supplies:

    Iris Polyester ultra brite embroidery thread – assorted colors

    Bobbin thread – white 

    RE20 embroidery hoop

    Sulky Sticky Fabri-Solvy stabilizer (water-soluble)

    Tear-away stabilizer (to float under the length of the hoop)

    Cotton ribbon 1.5” wide (your choice of color and desired length)

    Organ needle size 12 or 14

    Water-soluble marking pen (optional)

    Janome curved embroidery scissors

     

    Machine Used

    Janome Skyline 9

     

    Wrapping Paper

    Assorted Florals 

     

    Don’t forget mom’s presents! 



    Celebrating moms and all mother figures around the world this month is always inspiring to me. 

     

    I look forward to the love and unique experiences this holiday brings to my family. There are always opportunities to spoil the mother figures in our lives and we never take for granted the chance to show them just how much we care about them.

     

    While I pondered what project to create for this submission, I knew that I wanted it to be customizable for any occasion, quick, and most importantly, meaningful

    The ribbon that I used for this project was repurposed from another package I received in the mail. It was too good not to reuse it.

     

    Let’s get started!

     

    • Hoop the sticky Sulky wash away stabilizer

     

    • Position multiple lengths of ribbon using the entire hoop leaving small gaps in between each row. I made sure to twist the ribbon so that the text would appear right side when the ribbon was folded during gift wrapping. 

     

    HINT: Practice wrapping the gift so that you have an idea of how the text will lay once embroidered. You can use water-soluble pens to mark where you want the monogramming to appear exactly when you hoop it. 




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    • You are ready to customize your ribbon message (s). Going to the home icon on the upper right-hand side, select ABC.

     

    • Choose the text box that appears vertically (AB highlighted below) so that it runs the length of the ribbon. For letter-size, I chose Small and Medium and most of the time, lower case letters. If something does not look correct, you can use the “trash can” icon under “OK” to delete and start over. 

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    • As you type your desire phrases you can rotate, curve or space out each individual line of text within the edit screen to further customize your message. 

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    • Use arrows on the edit screen to move the text up/down or side to side to help you center the messages. 

     Once you are satisfied with the placement, you are ready to embroider!

     

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    HINT: Keep in mind that the ribbon will wrap around the objects, so moving the text to appear differently on the ribbon (i.e-top, middle, lower part), helps to see it more clearly. The same applies to the size of the font and thread color used (please see photo below).

     

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    • Carefully remove the ribbon from the sticky stabilizer and trim it back. You can dampen the ribbon if you like to remove the stabilizer but without testing it first for color run, I prefer to trim it instead. 

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    Helpful Hints: 

    Use your hoop grid template to assist you in aligning the text of your choice within the width of the ribbon.

    Untread your machine needle and hit the “start” button (when you are ready to start) to ensure that the text will appear in the desired spot before you start embroidering, that way you don’t have to remove stitches if it does not align correctly and ribbon or thread won’t be wasted. 

    Always “float” a piece of tear-away under the fabri-solvy stabilizer when embroidering on ribbon or delicate fabrics to prevent puckering. Start with a new needle. 

    Measure the boxes you will use to ensure that you have enough ribbon and that your text will appear where it will be readable.



    Now comes the fun part! Gift wrapping Mom’s gifts!

     

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    I hope this quick project inspires you to use and experiment with embroidering on ribbons to create customizable gift-wrapping accessories that are sure to delight makers and recipients alike. Testing on a small piece of ribbon will inform how best to stabilize the ribbon before making yards of it.  Have fun and happy gift-giving for all occasions!

     

    Maday.

     www.sustainabletextiledesign.com

  • 4/29/2021

    Spring is the season that makes us all so very happy with more daylight hours, butterflies, and warmer temperatures but also has its fair share of sneezing! We were thrilled when Janome Maker Rachel from Oak Blue Designs submitted a project that is the perfect way to beautifully contain your sneezes by making your own handkerchiefs!

    You can make these environmentally friendly handkerchiefs with lighter-weight fabrics or this could also be a wonderful upcycle using high-quality dress shirts or linen that is no longer being worn! Easy on the nose and the wallet! 

     

     

    Handkerchiefs… I have a special nostalgia for handkerchiefs.  I have collected them from family members of past generations.  I’ve enjoyed looking for them when I go into an antique store. There’s something so special about a small square of cloth that people have kept close to them. I’ve appreciated the traditions behind hand-stitched handkerchiefs. That said, I thought it would be really fun to do a modern take on the traditional handkerchief. 

    Today’s project is to make a handkerchief with a printed, lightweight garment fabric.  I loved the approach of making a handkerchief with a printed fabric.  Traditionally I’ve seen commercial and handmade handkerchiefs as non-printed fabrics. Whether you have scraps of linen, cotton voile, or cotton lawn lying around (or if this is your first time working with garment-weight fabrics), everyone can join in with this fun project. 

     

    You will learn how to stitch a rolled hem and add personalized, machine-stitched initials.  If you have not yet practiced stitching a rolled hem, this project is a great project to jump in and learn the technique! With all of the steps for this project being on the sewing machine, you will save time and could also make more versions to share as gifts.  This is not a fast process but it is a very satisfying one. A rolled hem takes some time but the end result is so worth it!

     

    The sewing machine used for this project is the Janome Skyline S9.  The sewing machine feet used are:

    Rolled hems make a perfect edge finishing detail for lightweight fabrics like chiffon and georgette. This is a great project to practice this technique.  Sewing with lightweight cotton or linen will be easier than sewing on sheer fabrics for a rolled hem (but this project is a great stepping stone to bridge the two fabric weights).  

     

    Supplies:

    • Rotary cutter & cutting mat

    • 2.5” square ruler

    • 12.5” square ruler

    • Iron & ironing board/pad

    • Tweezers

    • 11” Art Gallery Fabrics Cotton voile, Blossom Swale Depth print, V-16803 

    • Sewing machine thread 

    • 75/11 sewing machine needle

    • Tapered awl

    • Fine embroidery scissors

    • 2”x2” Iron-on tear-away stabilizer (Sulky Totally Stable™)

     

    Rolled hem edge

    The rolled hem foot should be attached to your machine for this section.  You may also reference page 86 in your Skyline S9 instruction book as well.

     

    1. Cut fabric into a 10 ½ “ x 10 ½ “ square. Iron fabric.

     

    1. Cut off all four corners, measuring ⅜” across the corner.  This step reduces bulk for the rolled hems. 

     

    1. Lay the fabric with the wrong side facing up on an ironing board or ironing pad.  Slightly fold the edges of the fabric in and press flat, repeating around all four edges.

    1. Fold the four edges of the fabric a second time.  Do not worry about measuring as in the previous step.  Pre-folding the edges in a double fold helps align the fabric for the rolled hem foot.

    1. Set the machine for the rolled hem edge:

      1. In the Home Screen, select the Garment icon.

     

    1. Select the Rolled Hem icon.

    1. The machine is ready to sew a rolled hem.

    1. To help neaten the edge, you will need to pull up and lengthen the bobbin thread.  Hold the end of the topstitching (upper) thread with your hand.

    2. While holding the top stitch thread, select the needle Up/Down button once and then a second time.

    1. Pull the topstitching thread to bring the bobbin thread above the needle plate.  You may need to remove the presser foot at this step to more easily access the bobbin thread. With tweezers, pull the bobbin thread out so you have a longer length of the bobbin thread to hold away from the needle plate.

    1. With the edge of the fabric folded under twice, set the fabric under the presser foot.  The fabric will not be inside the rolled spiral feature in the presser foot yet, the fabric will be flat, double folded under the presser foot.  

     

    You can use the awl at this step to ensure the end of the fabric is flat and turned under.

     

    1. Holding both the top stitch and bobbin threads with your hand, away from the fabric, start the first couple of stitches at a seam allowance in between ¼” and ⅛” to get the initial seam started.

    1. With the needle in the down position, raise the presser foot.

      

    1. Tuck the rolled hem into the swirl feature at the front of the rolled hem foot.

     

    1. Lower the presser foot.

    1. While holding the top thread/bobbin threads in your left hand, continue stitching the seam, keeping the double rolled edge inside the front swirl feature of the foot.  Once the seam has gotten past 2”, you don’t need to hold the top/bobbin threads.  If you need to re-adjust the placement of the fabric in the front swirl of the rolled hem foot, stop sewing with the needle in the down position and adjust fabric as needed.

    1. Stitch all the way to the end of the seam, using an awl as needed to keep the end of the fabric double folded (the previous pre-ironing step the fabric in a double fold makes this step much easier).

    1. As you get to the end of the seam, press the auto-lock button for three stitches to finish the end of the seam.  Do not forward/backstitch the beginning/ends of the seam as the material is thin and the threads will not finish well with a forward/backstitch.

    1. Press the thread cut button to end the first seam.

    1. Trim the ends of the threads at this step for a clean finish.

    1. Using an iron, double fold and press the perpendicular edge of the fabric in the next seam that you are getting ready to sew.  Pressing will make starting the next double folded seam very easy.

    1. You will repeat steps 6 - 19 for the next 3 edges of the fabric.  If you’re having a hard time getting the first stitches of the seam started with the feed dogs, use the thread tails to gently move the seam forward.  You can also raise the feed dog with the needle in the down position and readjust the fabric with the awl to move the fabric forward for the seam.

    2. After stitching all four edges of the fabric with the rolled hems, iron the fabric, flattening all four neatly finished rolled edges.



     

    Embroidered Initials

    Cut a 2” square of the tear-away stabilizer for this step.  You will need to remove the Rolled Hem Foot from the sewing machine and install the Open toe satin stitch foot F2 for this section.

    1. Pick the corner on your handkerchief to embroider the initials.

    2. Find the shiny side of your stabilizer.  Turn the handkerchief so the wrong side of the fabric is facing up.  Lay the stabilizer so the shiny (adhesive) side is facing down in the corner that you plan to embroider the initials.

    1. Set your iron to the appropriate settings (steam off, wool setting) and quickly baste the stabilizer square in place, pressing the corner of the handkerchief along the right side of the stabilizer/wrong side of the fabric.

    2. Turn the handkerchief over so the right side is facing up and press the stabilizer again in place.

    3. Let the fabric cool and then turn over the handkerchief to test the adhesion of the stabilizer.  If the stabilizer has not adhered to the fabric, repeat steps 3-4 for the stabilizer to fuse to the fabric.

    4. Select the Monogram icon (A) to get to the Monogram screen.

    1. Select the Script icon.

    1. With the “large” icon selected and “upper case letter key” selected (as shown in the photo below), select the two or three letters to stitch your own initials. 

     

    For this example, the RB letters were selected.  You can do your own variations for your project as well (add a period in between the letters, add different spacing in between the letters, etc.).  If you decide to stitch a name instead of initials, you will need to cut a larger piece of stabilizer than previously recommended.

    1. As you place your fabric under the presser foot, keep in mind that the stitching will be vertically stitched.

    1. Start stitching the initial stitches of your first letter in the monogram.  

    1. After stitching the first couple of stitches, trim the long topstitch thread (for a cleaner finish).

    1. When your stitches are finished, use the cut thread key to trim the end thread.

    1. Using embroidery scissors, trim the stop stitched and bottom threads to neaten the finish.

    1. With the wrong side of the fabric facing, gently peel back the stabilizer away from the fabric.

    1. Pinch the embroidered stitches and gently tear away the extra stabilizer, away from the stitches.  If you need to use tweezers at this step, they are a helpful tool as well (just be gentle as you do this step).

              

    1. Enjoy your finished, embroidered handkerchief!

     

     

  • 4/29/2021

    Janome Makers are amazing! They constantly try out new ways to use all of the features on their Janome machines and come up with fresh ideas to share. Maker Danielle Amato has many videos on the Janome YouTube channel featuring different projects that are geared towards garment sewing. In this tutorial, Danielle uses the Janome Artistic Digitizer software to upcycle a crewneck with fun applique and fabric scraps! 

    I have been absolutely loving my Skyline S9. This week I finally decided to get into the appliqué side of what this machine can do. Thanks to the help of Janome's Artistic Digitizer, this was such an easy and fun way to update an old crewneck.

     

    Creating the Applique File

     

    The first thing I did, was type out the word I wanted on my sweatshirt, into the Artistic Digitizer software. Because who doesn't love coffee enough to put it on your sweatshirt?

     

    After I typed out the word, I picked the font that I liked and I curved it to look more like collegiate lettering.

    Since my hoop is only 5.5" wide, I have to resize my image to be the width that I want on the chest of the sweatshirt. Once I sized the full image to how big I want it on the sweatshirt, I split the design in half and put it on two separate hoop files. When I go to appliqué the sweatshirt, I will do the first half of the word, and then re-hoop the sweatshirt and do the second half of the word (more on this later)

     
     

    Once I do that, I go over to the sidebar under "Fill" and select "Applique". I also select "Fix Satin" to give that satin-edged look around the letters. You will now see that the letters changed from a complete satin fill to the look of fabric with sating stitching around the letters. I can now send the files over to my machine.

     

    Hooping the Sweatshirt

    First, I marked 3" down from the neckband, made a cross mark. Folding the sweatshirt in half, matching shoulders, I found the center front line and marked. These marks will be the guidelines for when I hoop the sweatshirt.

     
     

    The first step in the appliqué file will outline the placement of the appliqué. Once this is stitched out, you can then place the fabric you would like on top of it. Make sure that the fabric piece is larger than the outline.

     

    Once your fabric is placed, the next step is to tack down the fabric.

     

    Once the fabric is tacked down, carefully cut the excess fabric as close to the stitching line as you can.

    After this, the next step for the machine is to create the satin edge.

    This process will repeat for each letter.

     

    After I finished the first half of the word, I re-hooped the sweatshirt and repeated this process for the second half. The final result is a great top that you will wear often! You can use this technique to add your personal touch to garments, bags, quilts, and home decor! 

     
     

     

    We are excited to announce that for the month of May you can get a month free to try out Janome Artistic Digitizer! You can register for this trial through May 15th! The trial ends on May 31, 2021. This offer is only good for Janome America and Janome Canada. 

  • 4/27/2021

    Welcome back to the Janome Rainbow Quilt Block of the Month 2021! designed by Janome Maker Carolina Oneta

    This month is Block 3, The Churn Dash Block. The Churn Dash Block originated around 1800-1845. As with many other blocks, it is based on what was in the homes and lives of the creators. This simple 9 patch block was one of the first to be learned by young girls also has many other names including Broken Plate and Monkey Wrench.  Carolina shows how you can take a traditional block and make it modern with the fabrics that you choose! 

     

     

    Fabrics:    

    White background

    · One 7” square

    . One strip 2.5” x 18”

     

    Yellow

    . One strip 2.5” x 18”

     

    Orange

    · One  7” square

    · One  4.5” square

     

    INSTRUCTIONS:

     Make four half-square triangles.

    • Place a white and orange fabric square right sides together.
    • Sew a 1/4″ seam allowance all around the perimeter of the square.
    • Make two diagonal cuts and press each piece open to one side.
    • Trim away the dog ears using a square quilting ruler, you will obtain 4 - 4.5” half square triangles.

     

    • Sew the two long strips of fabric, right sides together.
    • Next, cut your sewn strip of fabrics into four equal parts 4.5”. Press these units to the dark side.
    • Join all rows according to the diagram below. Use a quarter-inch seam allowance.

     

     

     

    Press your completed block and trim down to 12.5″ square.

     

    If you are just joining in, please be sure to make Block One and Block Two on the Janome Blog! 

     

     

    After you finish your block, please be sure to share a photo on your social media! We love to see what you are creating! 

    Janome Sewing Classroom on Facebook

    Instagram

    Pinterest

    Twitter

    Be sure to use the hashtags:

    #janomemakes + #rainbowquiltBOM2021 also,  tag @janomeamerica and @carolina_oneto!

     

     

     

     

     

  • 3/24/2021

     

    How to Make a Sewing Machine Organizer 

     

     

     

     

     

    Helping keep your sewing tools handy helps to keep your sewing time more efficient! Janome Artisan Maday Delgado from Sustainable Textiles Designs created a fantastic solution and tutorial using the limited edition 100 Anniversary Janome fabric!

    I’m so excited to share this easy sewing room organizer with you and I can’t believe it took me eleven years to make one! I used the Accuquilt Go cutting system to streamline the fabric cutting process. I also included two rulers that you can use instead, to create hexagons and triangles.

    With this organizer, you will have all of your favorite sewing notions visibly at your fingertips, maintain a tidy sewing table and celebrate Janome’s 100th anniversary. This project can be adapted to fit into any room or make into a table mat or larger quilt.

     

     

     Helpful Hints:

    I used 1/8” and ¼” seams throughout this project and ironed seams to the side.

    When you work with hexagons or half-hexagons, it helps to stitch units in rows vs a completed block, to avoid y-seams.

    Stitch length – 2 – 2.2”

    The triangles in this project are equilateral (all sides are equal). The stitching sequence is the same no matter what side we choose.

    Adjust the vinyl size if you would like to create deeper pockets.

    Supplies:

    4 assorted color fat quarters or scraps

    Janome 100th Anniversary fabric – half a yard

    GO! Half Hexagon-4 1/2" Sides (4 1/4" Finished) Die

    GO! Equilateral Triangle-4 1/2" Sides (4 1/4" Finished) Die

    Quilt in a Day 60-degree Equilateral triangle Ruler (8 ½”) – Optional

    Hex N More Ruler by Jaybird Quilts – Optional

    Book – Simplicity by Gyleen Fitzgerald – Optional

    Clear vinyl or favorite color (7.5”x22”)

    Batting (28” square)

    Backing fabric (28” square)

    Coordinating 50wt cotton thread for top and bobbin

    Clips/fine pins

    Organ needle 90/14

    Machine Used

    Janome Continental M7 - with hp 1/4” foot/hp needle plate

    Cut triangles and half-hexagons (HH) using AccuQuilt dies

    6 Janome fabric triangles and HH, 6 triangles of print 2 (hearts), 6 triangles of print 3 (light blue), 3 HH of print 4 (dark blue), 3 HH of print 5 (geometrical cream)

    Make 6 units  – Join triangle and HH as shown below 

     

     

    When you have all of the pieces cut, arrange them on your design wall or on any flat surface to make sure you are happy with the layout.

    Taking a photo helped me to visualize the pieces that were out of order.

     

     

    Make 6 of the following unit – the triangle die, cuts perfect dog ears, matching the corners has never been easier.

      

    Add 3 dark blue HH to 3 of the above units and 3 geometrical cream HH to the remaining 3. Stitch the half-hexagons to print 2 (hearts). See below

     

      

    The finished large triangle units (60-degree equilateral triangle), are comprised of 3 triangles and 2 HH each.

    Stitch units in the order below, as rows. You will have two rows. The vinyl will be attached to most of the bottom row to create a pocket with compartments for tools.

     

    Use 1/8” seam allowance to stitch vinyl to the lower half of the hexagon and two sides. Pin using fine pins to hold it in place.

      

     

     

    Using the top as a guide, trim backing, and batting to the same size. Place organizer top and backing RST, batting on the bottom. Use pins or clips to keep layers together.

     

       

     

    Leave a 5” opening to turn the organizer right side out. It helps if the opening is left on the side that does not have the extra layer of vinyl.

     

    Push all corners carefully out after turning and topstitch 1/8” or ¼” from the edges.

    If you need to press the organizer, I recommend carefully ironing from the backside as to not melt the vinyl.

      

     

     Now you are ready to stitch/create the pockets of the organizer that will best accommodate the sewing tools you use regularly.

     

     

    Your organizer is ready to enjoy! As you can see below, it makes the perfect centerpiece for small tables as well.

     

    I recommended a book, under the supply list, that I think you would enjoy from an artist that loves to work with polygons. If you are curious about working with interesting shapes, this book will surely delight you.

     

    Happy Making!

    Maday.

    www.sustainabletextiledesign.com

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